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Santiago Cucullu

Santiago Cucullu at work

Santiago Cucullu

Ukiyo-e style woodcuts

The Archivists Labor of Love, Natty Dress Until the End and A Carved Breakfast Nook in the Style of 1950s American Baroque Furniture are three new diptychs from Highpoint Editions. The three Ukiyo-e style woodcuts, measuring 22 inch x 18 inches each, mimic an open book. Each panel suggests flashes of memory or historical snapshots reflecting the artist’s imagination, personal travel experiences and inspiration from television and works of fiction. Cucullu’s work (which he has referred to as a “visual mixed tape”) frequently comments on how autobiography is filtered through collective experience, and these new prints continue his exploration and collaging of memory.

The Seventh Thread had Greenish Walls a Bathroom in the Hall

During the fall of 2008, Santiago Cucullu collaborated with Highpoint Editions to produce The Seventh Thread had Greenish Walls a Bathroom in the Hall, a beautiful suite of seven screenprints. The occasion was Highpoint’s participation in the 2008 Mid-America Print Conference, held in Fargo, North Dakota that year. Visitors to the conference watched Highpoint Master Printer Cole Rogers and his staff print Cucullu’s intricate imagery in silver ink on black Plike paper. The prints were inspired by Cucullu’s stay in Berlin during the summer of 2008; they feature buildings built shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall and contemporary anti-fascist graffiti.

Architectonic vs H.R.

HP Editions is pleased to announce the completion of a yearlong project with Argentinean-born artist Santiago Cucullu, released during the Editions/Artists Book Fair in New York City on November 2–5, 2006.

This ambitious publication consists of twelve 37 x 30 inch sheets of paper tiled together to make a 9-foot by 10-foot piece, echoing the installation-based murals for which Cucullu is known. Architectonic vs. H.R. features vibrant screenprinted layers that swirl and loop around black-and-white lithographic vignettes. Each individual “tile” contains different scenes, which suggest flashes of memory or historical snapshots, and can be re-arranged in varying combinations. Cucullu’s work (which he has referred to as a “visual mixed tape”) frequently comments on how autobiography is filtered through collective experience, and his new publication for HP Editions continues this exploration.

About the Artist

“Milwaukee-based Argentinean artist Santiago Cucullu chooses historically marginalized figures and events (often from his homeland’s anarchist movement) as the subject of his works, which include large wall drawings made of contact paper, watercolors, and sculptures. Cucullu’s references to figures such as anarchist and pamphlet printer Severino di Giovanni, Giovanni’s compatriots Alejandro and Paulino Scarfo, their Spanish forefather Fermin Salvochea, and the historian Osvaldo Bayer inflect a typical chronology of revolutionary fervor and protest, usually traced in straight lines from France, Russia, and Italy to the United States and back to Europe.” -Brian Sholis, Essay for “Hammer Projects: Santiago Cucullu”, Aug. 14, 2004 – Jan. 9, 2005

Santiago Cucullu’s has exhibited internationally, with solo exhibitions at Dean Jensen Gallery, Milwaukee, WI; Galeria Labor, Mexico City, Mexico; Galeria Umberto Di Marino, Naples, Italy; and Center for the Study of World Civilization, Tokyo, Japan. Cucullu has been included in group exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; and the Musee de Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, France. He was included in the Whitney Biennial in 2004 and has been the recipient of many grants and residencies, including a residency at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Cucullu is based in Milwaukee, WI.