highpoint_header_logo
Info-for-Educators-image

Information for Educators

Printmaking Partnership Options

Below are selected descriptions of printmaking classes available to school age visitors.

Highpoint will work with educators and schools to tailor these options to fit your specific curriculum needs, budget, and schedule. Activities are organized by learning levels that are flexible, and presented to provide a general guideline. Class complexity and challenge increases with the age of visitor.

All options occur within a 2-hour timeframe at Highpoint except special project options for high school visitors. Special project options will require more time at Highpoint in order to complete.

 

Basic Partnership Options

Highpoint serves school visitors in Kindergarten and up. Age and ability level will determine the type and difficulty level of each class.

Special Project Options

Some of these partnership options may only be appropriate for high school visitors. These options require 3-5 hours to complete and require an understanding of sequential processes.

 


Basic Printmaking Partnership Options

Monoprint

WebsiteMONO

The term monoprint describes a print that can only be printed once in its original state, unlike other forms of printmaking. This technique is also the most painterly of the printmaking processes. Students use water soluble ink to draw or paint an image onto a plexiglass plate. A dampened piece of paper is laid on top of the inked plate and run both are run through an etching press to create a unique, one of a kind print. Students may also choose to cut and apply stencils to their inked plate to create a design.

Running the monoprint plate through the press one additional time can create a “ghost”, transferring a faint image. This image can then be printed over again with a fully inked plate to create different textures and ink variations. Techniques and concepts learned include:

  • Working on additive and subtractive inking methods

  • Learning about positive and negative space

  • Color mixing

  • Using rollers, brushes, and other tools to create a composition on a plate

  • How to safely and successfully print using an etching press

Monoprint classes are 2 hours in length.  Highpoint uses plexiglass plates measuring 8 by 12 inches.  Each student can expect to make at least one print, but often they make many more.  Students can make as many prints as they have time for.  Recommended for kindergarten and up.

 

Drypoint Intaglio

websiteDRYPOINT

Intaglio (pronounced en/TAHL/yoh) is an Italian word that means to carve or cut into. Intaglio describes many different processes using a scratched, cut or etched metal or plastic plate. Working on zinc plates, students use a stylus to scratch line drawings in the metal. Students ink the incised lines and recessed textures of the plate, and wipe the smooth plate surface clean. A dampened piece of paper is then placed on top of the plate and run through an etching press, which uses extreme pressure to force the paper into the inked lines. Concepts learned during this project include:

  • How to safely work on metal plates with etching tools

  • Composition using shape and line

  • How to create values of dark and light with line and texture

  • How to successfully ink and wipe a plate

  • How to safely and successfully print using an etching press

Drypoint classes are 2 hours in length.  Students will each receive a 4 by 6 inch zinc plate to make their prints.  Each student can expect to make at least one print from their plate, but can make as many as time allows.  Recommended for 3rd grade and up.

 

Relief Printing

WebsiteRELIEF

Relief is the oldest form of printmaking. In relief classes students use a sharp tool to carve away areas of a block made out of an easy to carve rubber material called Soft Kut.  The printed lines of a relief print are often bold, and the use of positive and negative space is very important when composing the design. Ink is applied to the block after it is carved. A student uses a brayer or a roller to apply a thin, even coating of ink to the block. The image is transferred onto paper by rubbing the back of the paper with a rubbing tool called a barren. Concepts learned during this project include:

  • Use of positive and negative space

  • How to use block cutting tools successfully and safely

  • Using rollers to ink block

  • Transferring the image onto paper by hand-burnishing

  • Color theory through color mixing

  • Composition

Relief classes are 2 hours in length.  Each student will receive a 4 by 6 inch Soft Kut carving block to make their print.  Students can carve both sides of the block and can expect to make as many prints as time allows. Recommended for 3rd grade and up.

 


Special Project Options

Large Format Monoprint

WebsiteLARGEMONO

Working on clear Plexiglas plates, students will use ink to draw or paint onto the smooth surface using rollers, brushes, palette knives, cotton swabs, stencils and cloth. When the plate is ready the student will lay a damp piece of paper on top of the plate and run both through an etching press. Techniques and concepts learned during this process include:

    • Working on additive and subtractive inking

    • Learning about positive and negative space

    • Preparing and printing a larger scale print

    • Color theory through color mixing

    • Preparing and using a wide range of stencil material

    • Using rollers, brushes, and other tools to create a composition on a plate

    • How to safely and successfully print using the etching press

Classes are 2-3 hours in length.  Students have the option of using a plexiglas plate measuring 12X16in, 16X20in, or 18X24in.  Each student can expect to make at least one large print, but can make as many as time allows.

 

Color Drypoint

websiteCOLORDRYPOINT

See Drypoint for process details.  There are various ways to add color to a drypoint print. This class will teach students how to add color to the entire plate through color inking, surface rolling and selective color through stencils and chine-collé. Chine-collé is a process of adding delicate pieces of shaped paper to a print while it runs through the etching press. Techniques and concepts learned during this process include:

    • How to safely work on metal plates with etching tools

    • Composition using shape and line

    • How to create values with line and texture

    • How to successfully ink and wipe a plate

    • How to add color to an image through stencil techniques

    • Chine-collé techniques

    • How to safely and successfully print using an etching press

Classes are 2-3 hours in length.  Students will receive one zinc plate to make their image.  Each student can expect to make one drypoint intaglio print, but can make as many as time allows.

 

Reduction Relief Block Printing

websiteREDUCTION

Reduction relief printing is a method to achieve a multicolor print using one block.  Students will create a drawn image using three different colors. Using their drawing as a guide, they will alternate between printing a color and carving to show the layer beneath.   Techniques and concepts learned during this process include:

    • Use of positive and negative space

    • How to use block cutting tools successfully and safely

    • Using brayers to apply ink to a block

    • Transferring the image onto paper by hand printing with a barren

    • Color theory through color mixing

    • How to build a composition through layers of images and color

    • How to print colors in succession

    • How to register different layers of color accurately

    • How to edition a print

Reduction classes will be 3 hours in length.  Students will receive one 4X6 inch Soft Kut block to carve for their print.  Each student can expect around 3 successful prints, though this can vary.

 

Screenprinting

websiteSCREENPRINT

Screenprinting is the process of using a stencil on a stretched, fine mesh, and pressing ink through the mesh.  For this class, students first create a drawing on frosted Dura-lar.  This drawing acts as a stencil. Drawings/stencils are exposed to a screen using a photosensitive emulsion that coats the mesh. The drawing acts as a positive, and the emulsion is exposed with an exposure light unit.  Students print their screens onto paper using water based inks.   Techniques and concepts learned during this process include:

    • Use of positive and negative space

    • How to utilize the print studio safely

    • Making positives

    • How to use an exposure unit

    • How to prepare a screen for printing

    • Building a composition through layers of images and color

    • How to clean and maintain screens and the print studio

    • How to register different layers of color accurately

    • How to edition a print

Screen classes are two 2-3 hour classes, or one 5 hour class.  Students can make a one color edition measuring 11 by 17 inches, or a two color edition measuring 8.5 by 11 inches.  Each student can expect around 5 prints.  Dura-lar (or any frosted transparency) drawings should be done before the first visit.